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St Oswald'sC of E AcademyChurch, School, Community

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Welcome toSt Oswald'sC of E AcademyChurch, School, Community

Art

Art and Design

 

At St Oswald's we encourage the children to find enjoyment, fulfilment and achievement in art, craft and design and to see themselves as artists, designers and craft workers. We value the art work of our children and celebrate their achievements with high quality displays, fostering a real sense of pride in their work.

 

Throughout all year groups, we offer a wide range of creative opportunities to develop artistic skills in drawing, painting, collage, sculpture, textiles and printing. We build on the artistic skills, experience and understanding which each child already possesses, ensuring a progression of key skills.

 

Most of our artwork is linked to cross curricular work which gives it a real purpose and also provides opportunities for studying historical, cultural and religious art. It is through these art activities that children develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space. They also learn to use a range of materials and tools effectively and competently

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We teach our children to appreciate the work of artists and craftspeople and to use them as valuable sources of inspiration for their own work. They are also encouraged to evaluate their own work and that of their peers.

 

National Curriculum:  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-art-and-design-programmes-of-study

 

Progression in Art and Design key strands

Drawing

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

EYFS

By the end of F2, children can use muscle movements to paint and make marks and when using pencils they have a comfortable grip with good control when holding pens and pencils. They are able to draw with increasing complexity and detail such as representing face with a circle and including details. Children will show know about a range of artists including Gerhard Richter, Wassily Kandinsky and Rick Roberts. They will be able to say what they notice about the work such as what types of lines have been used or what they think about it. Children will develop their understanding of what a line is and how lines can be made different, e.g. as a zigzag or straight/long or short.

 

Key Stage 1

By the end of Year 2, children have built on their previous knowledge of mark making and have begun develop their sketching skills. They are able to use, match and name a variety of skills such as cross-hatching, stippling and scribbling to add texture and detail to their work. Children will investigate and understand tone by drawing light and dark lines, patterns and shapes. They will be able to draw these shapes from observations that demonstrate a wide use of mark making as well as from copying. Children will show an understanding of a range of artists’ works including Leonardo Da Vinci and will be able to show where he has used different techniques in paintings studied. Children will understand and be able to explain how to create light and dark lines, patterns and shapes.

 

Lower Key Stage 2:

In Lower Key Stage 2, children can now draw for sustained periods, using a sketchbook to collect and develop their ideas from a range of sources. Children are able to experiment further with marks and lines using a wide range of implements such as charcoal, chalk, pencil and more. They are able to create textures and patterns in a variety of different tones and talk about the visual and tactile qualities of the drawing. Children will show an understanding of shades of colour and have an awareness of the effect of light has on the appearance of objects. Children will show an understanding of a range of artists work including Vincent Van Gogh, Henry Moore and Giorgio Morandi and be able to explain how they have used a range of techniques to create shadows and the impact of this.

 

Upper Key Stage 2

In Upper Key Stage 2, children can use their knowledge of line and tone to apply appropriate visual and tactile techniques to suit the intended purpose. Children can make drawings in their sketchbooks and record observations of a range of artefacts and images studied annotating work and commenting on distinctive features. Children will understand and be able to explain how to create perspective and use this knowledge to evaluate artwork by artists studied. They are able to use a wide range of techniques to create a range of effects demonstrating perspective and the effect of light using line, texture tone in more detail e.g. through crosshatching.

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

Painting

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

EYFS

By the end of F2, children can explore colour, colour mixing, and use this to share their creations explaining the process they have used. Children are beginning to show emotion on their paintings like happiness, sadness and fear.  Children will be able to name a variety of colours starting with primary and progressing to secondary. They will be able to identify colours in works of artists such as Henri Matisse and Piet Mondrian.

 

Key Stage 1

By the end of Year 2, children have built on their previous knowledge of the colour wheel and can confidently name primary and secondary colours and start to use these to create different shades and tones by adding black and white.  Children are able to talk about a range of different painting mediums and can explain how to use tools correctly to make marks and strokes accurately. Children are able to combine paint and choose materials to create a detailed texture that uses a variety of different marks, strokes, shapes and patterns. Children are able say where the background and foreground of a landscape picture is and this knowledge within their own artwork.

 

Lower Key Stage 2:

In Lower Key Stage 2, children can build on their previous knowledge to experiment with different effects and textures including blocking in colour, washes, thickened paint creating textural effects, adding depth and distance. Children are able to use colour mixing and matching to develop tints and shades using a variety of mediums including watercolours. They are able to use a range of paintbrushes and paint, appropriate to the task, to create patterns and strokes of different sizes and textures. Children will be able to talk about the genre of painting still life and use this knowledge to create their own pieces of artwork inspired by the movement. Children will be able to explain why an artist has used the medium chosen and the impact this has on the piece.

 

Upper Key Stage 2

In Upper Key Stage 2, children can use their knowledge of texture to select, mix and apply paint and other materials to create patterns using a range of brushstrokes to indicate changes in shape and form. Children will have a good understanding of colour families and are able to use opposite colours, clashing colours and complimentary colours to create contrast and mood within their work. They will be able to use paint, including acrylic to represent objects in different ways for example to show reflections.  Children will understand why acrylic is used as a medium and how this differs in comparison to other mediums such as watercolours, they will be able to justify their views on which medium is best for their artwork through giving reasons.

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

Collage

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

EYFS

By the end of F2, children are able to explore different materials freely in order to develop their ideas about how to use them and what to make. They are able to join different materials and explore different textures when creating collages.  Children will understand what a collage is and be able to talk about what materials they could use to create one. They will be able to describe collages they have creative using simple adjectives such as hard, soft, smooth or big. They will understand how to use equipment such as scissors safely.

 

Key Stage 1

By the end of Year 2, children have developed their previous collage skills including the use of scissors and are able to collage with a range of materials. They will understand how to use a range of tools and everyday objects to create marks and patterns and sort these according to specific qualities e.g. warm, cool, shiny or smooth. Children can fold, crumple, tear and overlap paper then use adhesives to select and place cut and torn shapes onto a surface to convey a simple idea. Children will have opportunities to experiment with constructing and joining a range of materials including recycled, natural and manmade. Children will be able to talk about an artist studied (Picasso) and describe what his pictures are like and what mediums have been used.

 

Key Stage 2

By the end of Key Stage 2, children can use a range of different techniques, colours and textures to design and make a piece of work. They are able to experiment with a tearing, overlapping and layering to create images and represent textures within their artwork. Children build their ability to design and create a final piece that conveys a meaning, theme or message as in a painting, using experimentation of ideas and processes. They are able to use a wide range of natural, reclaimed and manmade items ensuring that the materials picked match intentions of the design. Children are able to talk about an artist/s who specialises in collages (Eileen Downes and/or Kurt Schwitters) and explain the mediums used and why they think the artist has composed the piece in the way they have and the impact of this on the viewer.

 

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

Printing

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

EYFS

By the end of F2, children are able to explore, use and refine a variety of artistic effects to express their ideas and feelings. They are able to safety use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques within their work to create different designs, textures and forms.  Children will be familiar with the works of Paul Klee and will be able to talk about what they can see e.g. the colours or shapes used. Children will understand how to use equipment safely.

 

Key Stage 1

By the end of Year 2, children have built on their previous knowledge of printing and are now able to use a range of printing materials and tools including everyday materials. Children are able to explore and create patterns that repeat and include textures with an extended range of both given and found materials for example, sponges, leaves, vegetables and more. They are able to roll ink or paint over objects (self-created or found) to create patterns and experiment with how to differ the colour, texture and shape. Children will show an increasing understanding of what printing is and will be able to pick colours used based on the effect they have e.g. I have picked green because its bright. They will understand what a repeating pattern is and be able to explain this to others. Children will be able to name a printing artist, Gustav Klimt and say what they notice about the piece, thinking about techniques, patterns and colours used.

 

Lower Key Stage 2:

In Lower Key Stage 2, children can now confidently compare and explain the differences and similarities between the work of artists, craft makers and designers from different historical periods (Gordy Wright and Sarah Alps) and make links to their own work. Children will build on their knowledge of repeating patterns and use this to explore and experiment with colours and themes. They are able to develop, express and represent their ideas and discuss the use of colour and imagery. Children will show an increasing understanding of printing techniques such as collographs and will be able to explain why they chose the colours, textures etc. for their print and the impact this has on the piece.   

 

Upper Key Stage 2

In Upper Key Stage 2, children can use their knowledge of line and tone to apply appropriate visual and tactile techniques to suit the intended purpose. Children can make drawings in their sketchbooks and record observations of a range of artefacts and images studied annotating work and commenting on distinctive features. They are able to understand and use a wide range of techniques to create a range of effects demonstrating perspective and the effect of light using line, texture tone in more detail e.g. through crosshatching. Children are able to evaluate artists work (William Morris) through techniques, colours and textures used and discuss the impact of this. They are able to use an artist’s work to help inspire their own piece.

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

Textiles

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

EYFS

By the end of F2, children able to use fabric to weave and create simple patterns. They will be able to move fabric/paper up and down and under and over to create simple weaves. Children will be familiar with the works of Michael Brennand Wood and will be able to say what they notice about his work. Children will understand how to move fabric/paper over and under to create a weave.

 

Key Stage 1

By the end of Year 2, children will be able to design a functional and appealing product for a chosen user and purpose based on a simple given design criteria. They will be able to select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks such as cutting, joining and finishing. Children will be able to select from and use textiles according to their characteristics and explain why they have chosen the medium used. They will be able to evaluate a range of existing products and their ideas throughout and their final product against the design criteria. Children will know what a tapestry is and will show an understanding of the techniques needed to create one, e.g. which stitch would be best to attach felt? They will know about the artist Henri Rousseau and will begin to explain what they notice about his pieces in terms of tones, feelings and colours e.g. in ‘Surprised’ the sky is cold colours.

 

Key Stage 2

In Upper Key Stage 2, children will be able to generate innovative ideas through research including surveys, interviews and questionnaires. They will be able to develop, model and communicate ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and prototypes. The children can produce detailed lists of equipment needed and formulate step-by-step plans including the range of tools they might need. Children are able to compare the final product to the original design specification and test their products with their intended user where possible to evaluate the quality of the design, manufacture, functionality and fitness for purpose. Children will be confident in their understanding and will be able to select and use a wider range of tools for cutting, joining and finishing justifying why they have chosen that tool for the job. Children will be familiar with the works of Pacita Abad and Rebecca Greenwood and will be able explain what techniques they have used and how this differs between the two artists. They will be able to explain what the impact of using different techniques such as dyeing using splattering, wet cloths or using wax candles has on the fabric.

 

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

Photography

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

Key Stage 1

By the end of Year 2, children will know and understand how to use a digital camera and will be able to do this safely. They will be able to select, capture and save their images and begin to experiment with editing their images to improve their quality. Children will be able to use their photography within an art programme and make lines, shapes and colours to create a piece of artwork. They will be familiar with the works of Jimmy Nelson and will be able to explain the techniques used in his images.

 

Lower Key Stage 2:

In Lower Key Stage 2, children will be able to explore and explain ideas using digital sources. They are able to use their understanding to plan the use of a camera to take specific photos for a chosen or given purpose. Children will be able to talk confidently about given photography and can discuss what they can see and how it makes them feel. Children will be able to change the camera settings such as flash, to best capture an image in challenging light conditions e.g. in low light. They will show an awareness of mood, emotions and feelings when evaluation their own photography and the photography of others. Children will show an understanding of the rule of thirds and use this to ensure their own photographs are most appealing. They will show an understanding of the works of David Yarrow and will be able to identify the techniques used and how this changes the image.

 

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

Key stage 3 – National Curriculum Objectives

Pupils should be taught to develop their creativity and ideas, and increase proficiency in their execution. They should develop a critical understanding of artists, architects and designers, expressing reasoned judgements that can inform their own work.

Pupils should be taught:

  • to use a range of techniques to record their observations in sketchbooks, journals and other media as a basis for exploring their ideas
  • to use a range of techniques and media, including painting
  • to increase their proficiency in the handling of different materials
  • to analyse and evaluate their own work, and that of others, in order to strengthen the visual impact or applications of their work
  • about the history of art, craft, design and architecture, including periods, styles and major movements from ancient times up to the present day

 

Black – Disciplinary knowledge               Blue – Substantive knowledge

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