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Welcome toSt Oswald'sC of E AcademyChurch, School, Community

Geography

Geography at St Oswald's

 

Subject leads:  Miss J Calderbank and Mrs C Furniss 

 

Throughout school, we take a practical and theoretical approach to the study of Geography whereby children find out about their local surroundings and make connections between this and different countries and cultures, identifying similarities and differences with our locality and culture.

 

Children begin to develop their locational  in KS1 by identifying characteristics of different countries and also begin to build on their observational skills relating to both human and physical features both locally and internationally.  These skills are developed further in KS2 where field trips allow the children to study and record information from parts of the country other than our own, as well as identifying features of the local landscape and utilising a range of other skills to make sketches of locations and create pieces of writing or presentations about their experiences. Geographical knowledge is developed through the closer study and comparison of maps, using both digital resources and atlases, and children practise using compasses, grid references, symbols and keys to read and create their own maps and apply these skills practically.

 

At St Oswald's C of E Academy, we follow the new National Curriculum for Geography which can be found at the following site:

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239044/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Geography.pdf

 

We have a created a bespoke scheme of learning that allows the progression of skills throughout school, making links between different areas of the curriculum and applying their understanding of local issues to global ones that the modern world is seeking to address.

 

We value the connections we make within our local community, and are always seeking to develop working relationships with partners outside of the immediate school to enrich children's learning.

 

Ideas and suggestions for projects you might be interested in exploring with us can be emailed to Mrs Furniss and Miss Calderbank (subject leads) at admin@soa.dsat.education.

Progression in Geography key strands

 

Locational Knowledge

 

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

Year 1

The children in Year 1 are aware of their local surroundings and that they live in the United Kingdom. They are able to name and locate the four countries that make up the United Kingdom and are aware that each one has a capital city. They are able to recognise that the United Kingdom is an island and that it is surrounded by different seas.

 

Year 2

In Year 2, they continue to build on their understanding of the United Kingdom and their local surroundings. They are able to name and locate the seven continents of the world, the oceans that surround them and recognise that the United Kingdom is part of Europe. They are aware that each country within the United Kingdom is made up of different counties and can name and locate South Yorkshire. They are also able to name some non- European countries.

 

Year 3

In Year 3, pupils are building on prior learning and are able to identify and locate more cities that are part of the United Kingdom. They are able to locate different countries with increasing accuracy within Europe, North America and South America. They can also identify the position of the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere Arctic and Antarctic Circle and the Prime/ Greenwich Meridian.

 

Year 4

In Year 4, are more confidently able to name and locate different cities from the United Kingdom and are beginning to recognise the different counties of the UK. Pupils are now able to identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn as well as the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, Arctic and Antarctic Circle and the Prime/ Greenwich Meridian. They are becoming more confident in locating and comparing different countries within the continents of Europe, Northern America and South America and using data about climate, rainfall and temperature to compare different countries or regions.

 

Year 5

In Year 5, pupils become more accurate at locating different counties and cities from the United Kingdom. They are able to identify the position and significance of different time zones around the world and can name and locate different countries from a variety of different continents that make up the world. The pupils are now beginning to recognise and identify aspects of human and physical geography that has changed over time.

 

Year 6

In Year 6 pupils are becoming more confident with their ability to see how the world fits together. They are able to confidently name and locate cities and counties that are a part of the United Kingdom and are able to locate countries from the different continents of the world. They are able to confidently identify the significance of latitude, longitude, Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn as well as the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/ Greenwich Meridian and the different time zones. The pupils are now able to confidently recognise and identify aspects of human and physical geography that has changed over time.

 

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

Place Knowledge

 

As a child progresses through school they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

 

Year 1

In Year 1 the children study their local area starting with the school grounds. They are beginning to recognise the different physical and human features that make up an area. They also study the city of London and can identify some human and physical geographical similarities and differences between London and Finningley.

 

Year 2

In Year 2, the children broaden their understanding of their local area and can recognise human and physical features within it. They also conduct a comparison study between Finningley and Miami and can more confidently identify the human and physical geographical similarities and differences between both.

 

Year 3

Pupils in Year 3, continue to study their local area and understand the human and physical features. They can compare physical and human geographical features of Finningley with key settlements in North America.  They conduct a comparison study between North America and the United Kingdom and can identify and understand the geographical similarities and differences between both.  They recognise some major cities that are affected by natural disasters such as volcanoes and locate them on a world map, including San Fransisco in North America.

 

Year 4

In Year 4, pupils compare a region of the United Kingdom with a region in a European country and a non- European country. They are beginning to identify the similarities and differences between them in both human and physical geography.  They are able to talk about the features and position in the country of Finningley, Doncaster, Barnsley, Rotherham and Sheffield and can compare the features of mining vs agricultural villages in South Yorkshire.

 

Year 5

In Year 5, pupils compare a region of the United Kingdom with a region of a European country and a region within North or South America. They are able to identify the similarities and differences between the three in both human and physical geography. They can compare the local area with Marrick in North Yorkshire and find similarities and differences between both. They can identify human features and compare these across major cities within the United Kingdom, Europe and North and South America.

 

Year 6

In Year 6 pupils have studied a region of the U.K, a region in a European country and a region within North or South America and are able to understand similarities and differences between the three in physical and human geography.  They are able to locate the major cities and towns of the UK, particularly those that may have been affected by bombing during WW2, recognising why these cities were targeted by enemy forces.  They are able to identify similarities and differences in mining villages around Doncaster and recognise how and why they differ for Finningley and what the change over time has been in the features of the mining villages.

 

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

Human and Physical Geography

As a child progresses through school they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

Year 1

In Year 1 pupils have studied the different seasons and can identify seasonal patterns throughout the year. Pupils are able to identify which parts of the United Kingdom are warmer or colder than others and can use simple directional language to explain this. Pupils are beginning to use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to human and physical features.

 

Year 2

Pupils have studied seasonal patterns throughout the year and can identify both seasonal and daily weather patterns. Pupils can locate hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and North and South Poles. Pupils can use a wide range of basic geographical vocabulary to refer to human and geographical features.

 

Year 3

Pupils can describe several aspects of human and physical geography. Pupils can locate hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and Northern and Southern Hemisphere. They recognise that different areas fall in different biomes including aquatic, grassland, forest, desert and tundra and can begin to describe patterns in temperature and climate etc.

 

Year 4

Pupils can describe an increased range of aspects of physical and human geography, using a wide range of geographical terms.  They recognise that different areas fall in different biomes including aquatic, grassland, forest, desert and tundra, and that these can be subdivided into areas such as temperate rainforest, tropical rainforest, savanna, marine and freshwater.

 

Year 5

Pupils can describe and understand an increasing variety of key aspects of human and physical geography. They are able to use this understanding to justify their own opinion on land use. They can use maps to identify physical and human features of unfamiliar areas and can find areas that fit a set of criteria for new development including considerations of climate and temperature of particular biomes.   They can consider the economic and geographical impact on areas that are selected for development.

 

 

Year 6

Pupils can describe and understand a wide range of key aspects of physical and human geography, describing patterns in population growth, migration and trade routes for palm oil and other goods from areas with tropical rainforest to other places in the world.  They can use maps and atlases to find data about these areas and compare imports and exports across the world.  They can make links between human geographical impact on areas of natural resource and how this changes the physical geography of the area, being able to consider the balance of economic growth and conserving the planet and protecting against climate change.

 

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

Geographical Disciplinary Knowledge and Fieldwork

 

As a child progresses through school, they will reach the following milestones by the end of:

Year 1

Pupils will be able to use simple directions accurately and are able to make links with compass points on maps at some level. Pupils are able to draw simple maps of imaginary places and use symbols to mark specific locations. Pupils can accurately compare objects with detailed relative language and can ask questions about their surroundings using books or pictures as sources of information to help find answers.  They can make accurate observations about where things are in school and the local area.

 

Year 2

Pupils will be able to use age-appropriate maps, atlases and globes confidently to identify studied regions and match places using different scaled maps. Pupils are able to use simple 4-point compass directions confidently and can follow a route on a map and recognise landmarks. Pupils can devise a simple map with basic symbols in a key.  Pupils ask simple questions and use books, stories, maps, photos/pictures and the internet as sources of information to help answer the questions.  They can investigate their surroundings, making appropriate observations about why things happen and make comparisons between features of different places.

 

Year 3

Pupils will have practised using maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied and can use at least one confidently. Pupils are beginning to use four figure grid references and are becoming increasingly accurate with symbols and key. Pupils are able to make a map of a short route followed, using the four compass points to locate features in the correct places, making simple scale drawings where appropriate. Pupils are beginning to ask geographical questions and can use non-fiction books stories, atlases, pictures/photos and internet as sources of information, investigating places and themes at more than one scale. Pupils are able to locate some boundaries on different scaled maps.  Pupils can ask and respond to questions and offer their own ideas.  They can investigate places and themes at more than one scale, collecting and recording evidence with some aid. They are able to analyse evidence and draw conclusions e.g. make comparisons between two locations using photos/pictures/ maps.

 

Year 4

Pupils will be more confident using two of these three: maps/atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied. Pupils are beginning to use eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references and are more confident with symbols and keys, including the use of Ordnance Survey Maps, where they can explain why a key is needed and how to determine the symbols on them. Pupils ask and respond to questions and offer their own ideas, extending to satellite images, aerial photographs or other stimuli.   They can investigate places and themes at more than one scale, collecting and recording evidence with some aid. They are able to analyse evidence and draw conclusions e.g. make comparisons between locations photos/pictures/ maps. Pupils can make a map of a short route they have experienced, with features in the correct order and can make a simple scale drawing of a designated area.  They can match boundaries e.g. find the same boundary of a county on different scale maps.

 

Year 5

Pupils can confidently use two of these three: maps/atlases, globes and digital/ computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied, accurately comparing the similarities and differences in different media. Pupils can use most of the eight points of a compass, and use four figure grid references confidently and six figures more accurately and interpret symbols and keys (including the use of Ordnance Survey Maps). Pupils can ask and respond to questions and offer their own ideas, extending to satellite images, aerial photographs or other stimuli.   They can investigate places and themes at more than one scale, collecting and recording evidence with some aid. They are able to analyse evidence and draw conclusions e.g. make comparisons between locations photos/pictures/ maps. Pupils can use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using some of these methods: sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.  They make accurate comparisons between local and distant places, using primary and secondary sources of information.  They are able to compare maps with aerial photographs and select a map for a specific purpose. e.g. Picking an atlas to find Taiwan or an OS map to find a local village.   They are beginning to use atlases to find out about other features of places. e.g.  find wettest part of the world. and can make measurements on maps and use different scales accurately.

 

Year 6

 

Pupils can confidently use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied at a range of scales, using these to measure distance.  Pupils can confidently use the eight points of a compass, four and six figure grid references, symbols and key including the use of Ordnance Survey Maps.  Pupils can use fieldwork to answer their own geographical questions and observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.  They are able to compare land use, look at patterns in temperature etc. and explain reasons behind the differences. Pupils can draw a variety of thematic maps based on their own data and are beginning to draw plans of increasing complexity.  They can follow a short route on an OS map and describe and accurately locate features shown on them.    They are able to locate places on a world map and use atlases to find out about other features of places e.g. mountain regions and weather patterns.

 

As they transition to secondary school, pupils are able to transfer their understanding to the KS3 curriculum requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

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